Lorrie Maffey

 

Clinical Specialty Area: Musculoskeletal

Years in Practice: 25

Areas of Interest: Injury Prevention, Return to Sport, Performance Enhancement, Dry Needling, Manual Therapy, Real Time Ultrasound, Yoga, Post Professional and Post Graduate Physiotherapy Orthopaedic Education and Educational Standards, Mentorship. 

Hobbies: Outside of physiotherapy Lorrie loves spending time outdoors with her husband and little girl hiking, biking, canoeing, gardening or spending time with their animals (2 horses, 1 dog and over 60,000 bees!).

What did you find most rewarding about the program?

The Clinical Specialist program has created a platform for one to reflect on their professional career. I believe that reflection of one’s practice is one of the most important means to both advance as well as see a pathway for advancement of one’s knowledge and skills. I believe very much in the advancement of clinical skills and practice as well as acknowledgement of this within and outside of the physiotherapy community as this ultimately will advance the care of clients who require physiotherapy care for injury management and prevention. The creation of a specialization system that is unique, world class and has a variety of different means to achieve was very important to me and I am thrilled for CPA and all physiotherapists that this program is now in full swing. 

I am both surprised at all that I have been able to achieve to this point in time in my career yet humbled over how much more I still wish to do for clients and physiotherapists. This process of reflection has helped me identify what my future goals will be.

How will the clinical specialty program impact physiotherapy as a profession?  

Reflection as it is expressed in the program through the sharing of clinical reflections with  may invoke personal and professional changes and these change may involves risks by encouraging one to step from the known into the unknown. Reflection encourages contemplation which can lead to evolved thought processes which may change clinical care as well as the desire and ability to share this thought process with others. For example such changes may directly or indirectly affect research regarding patient care. This all leads to evolved collaborations within and outside of the profession which then may ultimately affect the place, style and kind of work one does within the profession.  

What is the value of the specialty program? 

Nothing worth doing comes easy. I remembered this frequently as I was going through the specialization application and process. It is always both shocking and rewarding how much time it takes to reflect on your own practice and put this to paper. I am both surprised at all that I have been able to achieve to this point in time in my career yet humbled over how much more I still wish to do for clients and physiotherapists. This process of reflection has helped me identify what my future goals (short and long term) will be for me. I already have had significant professional growth since receiving my designation of specialist and feel a wonderful sense of renewed energy and excitement regarding where this professional pathway will now take me.    

Do you have a quote that inspires you?

“Success is liking yourself, liking what you do and liking how you do it.” (Maya Angelou)